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-   -   Roguelike Celebration 2019 (http://angband.oook.cz/forum/showthread.php?t=9609)

Derakon October 6, 2019 04:22

Roguelike Celebration 2019
 
Is anyone here attending? Day one was great, lots of cool people and cool talks. They've set up a Twitch stream and Twitter account so you can participate and watch talks remotely. Angband 4.2.0 was running on one of the computers in the games corner, though there was some kind of movement bug where pressing a direction made you run instead of moving one step at a time.

https://roguelike.club

Ingwe Ingweron October 6, 2019 05:10

Quote:

Originally Posted by Derakon (Post 140388)
... Angband 4.2.0 was running on one of the computers in the games corner, though there was some kind of movement bug where pressing a direction made you run instead of moving one step at a time.

This bug is an angband.live bug. I have the same problem playing angband.live on my laptop. I have to change the keymap for the arrow keys to be ";#" (where # is what the movement direction would be on a keypad, i.e., 2,4,6,8). I then keymap a function <Fn> and arrow for running ".#"

Derakon October 6, 2019 05:21

Aha, good to know it's a known issue at least. We'll see if it's set up tomorrow; if so I'll try to rig up that fix. Thanks!

wobbly October 6, 2019 11:52

If its the same as angband.live turning on numlock works

Gwarl October 6, 2019 13:05

This is ultimately my fault but yes, numlock, and if the keyboards at RLcel lack numpads be sure to complain. You can help by making sure that numlock is left on at that computer.

Ingwe's fix will work too, but breaks shiftrunning.

Derakon October 7, 2019 04:54

It's a moot point; Angband wasn't on any of the computers on day two. Still, an awesome conference, highly recommended to anyone who can make it out to San Francisco. The talk on wave function collapse as a method for generating maps ought to be particularly of interest to devs here, since it sounds like a really simple technique that can be applied in a wide range of ways. Look for videos and transcripts to show up in the next few days!

bio_hazard October 8, 2019 19:02

One of these years I'm going to make it to this. I'll probably only understand 10% of what people are talking about but it sounds awesome.

Derakon October 8, 2019 22:53

The videos are available on Twitch right now, and will probably be on YouTube soon, so at the very least you can watch those and get a sense of how interesting they are. Some recommendations (either because the topic was inherently interesting to me, or because I thought the presentation was well done):
- Alexei Pepers (mapping roguelike devs to various D&D classes)
- Max Kreminski (extracting narratives out of giant piles of random events)
- Robin Sloan (getting computers to generate high-fantasy text)
- Thomas Biskup (on the dangers of relying on a bunch of veteran roguelike players' feedback when you want to appeal to general audiences)
- Brian Bucklew (an interesting technique for doing many different styles of map generation with a single program)
- Jim Shepard (making AIs that have more nuanced relationships with the PC beyond a basic linear reputation system)

There was also a trivia show at the end of day 2, which I personally quite enjoyed.

DrWho42 October 9, 2019 01:37

looking forward to celebrating my favourite game genre!

half October 9, 2019 12:27

That wave function collapse map generation is incredible. Check out the examples and videos:

https://github.com/mxgmn/WaveFunctionCollapse

half October 9, 2019 12:38

If only there were someone starting a new project with an absolutely massive map that was free to use a cutting edge procedural tool like this...

I assume you can quite easily use it to do multiscale maps, so that Beleriand could have a hand drawn top-level map of say 500 x 500 grids, then take each of those grids (and information about its neighbours) and generate its more detailed contents, and then do this again for each square in that grid, getting down to the @'s level after 2 or more iterations. This should work as you can also fix certain locations, such as the borders of the region to line up with its neighbours and then generate an interior. Doing it in a multilevel way like this would allow for coherence across larger distance scales than the algorithm provides for.

Nick October 9, 2019 13:08

Quote:

Originally Posted by half (Post 140451)
If only there were someone starting a new project with an absolutely massive map that was free to use a cutting edge procedural tool like this...

I assume you can quite easily use it to do multiscale maps, so that Beleriand could have a hand drawn top-level map of say 500 x 500 grids, then take each of those grids (and information about its neighbours) and generate its more detailed contents, and then do this again for each square in that grid, getting down to the @'s level after 2 or more iterations. This should work as you can also fix certain locations, such as the borders of the region to line up with its neighbours and then generate an interior. Doing it in a multilevel way like this would allow for coherence across larger distance scales than the algorithm provides for.

Thanks, I will look at this. Eventually :)


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